By on October 11th, 2012

This is the third in a series about photography techniques that provide artistic distortions.

 Dali re-constructed, a slitscan photo  by Duncan Creamer       via his Flickr page

 I fell in love with this photograph and asked the artist where he took it, thinking a Chinese New Years parade.  Good thing I asked.  Duncan Creamer’s explanation makes a great primer for slitscan effects.

It was actually shot with my iphone 3Gs on my back deck. The vertical bars are the light shifting as it filtered through the trees and the horizontal lines are the stucco on the house. I put the small Dali sculpture on a rotating base to get this shot.

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 Here’s another way to understand slitscan.  To read what’s going on in this image start at the right.  As our car pulls up at a stop light there’s a red car ahead of us and in the left lane.  The wide red rear end counts out the duration of the red light, the slitscan continuing leftward at a steady pace.  When traffic begins to move again we see the left taillight then some empty road where the car had been.

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Artful slitscans with notes on the photographers’ techniques.

Body Coat by jktales      via his Flickr page

Photographer’s notes: From a 3 day experimental and testing session in August 2010 with the Camera Donkey III, an experimental camera device. It’s a slit scan, the effect is out of cam.  And also, Wouldn’t actually know how to reproduce this picture, one of those nice random outcomes with slit scans.

 

 out42 by blueeyedpop, slitscan of the ocean   via his Flickr page

Photographer’s notes: capture video, convert to stills, process stills to derive slit, assemble slits into single imagewoot.

slith scan by DoubleNegativeSeb      via his Flickr page

Photographer’s notes: Been having some serious difficulties printing this heavily overexposed slitscan but it works quite nicely as a lith print on Kentmere Kentona in Novolith.

133 slices of the Grand Canal by pho-Tony       via his Flickr page

Photographer’s notes:  Taken with an Ilford Envoy box camera modified, using black paper, to take narrow slit images. One afternoon in August I took the Number 1 Vaporetto (water bus) in Venice from the Bacino San Marco, along the length of the Grand Canal to the Piazzale Roma. The journey of 3.5km takes about an hour. Every few moments I took a photo and advanced the film by 1/8th of a turn, moving to 1/10th of a turn towards the end as the take up spool grew in diameter as the film built up. There were 133 exposures in total. This image shows the entire width of the film.

133 slices of the Grand Canal by pho-Tony, detail    view the image at its original 8749 x 709 pixels here

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DIY Slitscan — Digital Apps You Can Try 

Slit-Scan Camera by Funner Labs, for iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad.  Good tutorial on their website.

 

This makes me wonder what slitscan would do with a good  game of Twister.  Artfully lit?  With every Twistee in a unique color of leotards and tights.

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ScanCamera  by studio-307.com, for iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad.  Optimized for iPhone 5.  Well-explained tutorials on their website.

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Coda: synchronicity at the local farmers’ market

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look further:
Where to see more slitscan work
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